What to Know About Switching to LED Lightbulbs

Swapping out incandescent for LED lightbulbs has several benefits. These include saving money on your electric bill, superior light quality, less impact on the environment and replacing bulbs once every decade or two instead of every few months.

But shopping for LEDs can be a dizzying experience. Aside from the bevy of bulb shapes to choose from, there are terms you’ve probably heard before, such as lumens and Kelvin, but don’t exactly understand. On top of that, there’s a seemingly endless array of light types and colors, such as daylight, warm white and so on. When you just need a couple of lightbulbs to replace, it all can be overwhelming.

If you’re thinking of making the switch, here’s what you should know about LEDs and selecting the best replacements. Click HERE for the full story.

Four New Ways to Use a Classic Onion Light Fixture

via Rikki Snyder, Photographer

via Rikki Snyder Photography

Even if you didn’t know it was called an “onion light,” you’ve almost certainly seen it before. Walk through any historic New England neighborhood and you’re bound to see one brightening the door of traditional cape or two. A glass lantern with an encircling metal cage, the onion light often sports a large carrying handle and has a utilitarian, Paul Revere-ish charm about it.

The light was actually created during the early 1800’s as a sturdy portable lantern that hung on the side of a house or barn when not in use. They also became popular in the marine and railroad industries. Early examples didn’t include the wire cage, but it was added to the design to protect the glass globe, or “onion.”

Having “hang-ups” today about its front-door-only stereotype, the beloved onion light has shed convention to take on new lighting roles, both indoors and out.

Here are four ways to showcase traditional onion lights in a new way:

One – Sconces

via Cape Associates, Inc_reviseWall-mounted onion lights, originally designed for outdoor use, make perfect wall sconces in traditional or modern settings. Already a wall-mounted fixture with a backplate, its design naturally lends itself to take on a wall sconce roll indoors without the need for modification.

In comparison to some other lantern styles, Colonial in particular, onion lights tend to be compact and vertically oriented. This makes for an easier installation in areas with tighter constraints, such as a paneled fireplace surround. Also, most onion lights utilize A-base light bulbs, which depending whether the fixture design has a canopied “hat” or not, provides an even, non-directional glow. Many other lantern styles are designed to use C-base candelabra bulbs which alternatively mimic the upward light created by candles.

via Andrea Swan - Swan Architecture

via Andrea Swan – Swan Architecture

Two – Pendant Fixtures

via Pinemar Inc. & T. Keller Donovan.

via Pinemar Inc. & T. Keller Donovan.

The best and most popular application for classic onion lights is as a pendant to provide ambient lighting in a room. Because pendants become visual focal points in a space, the classic onion light design holds up as something worth drawing the eye to.There are several manufacturers who make onion-style pendant lights. Or, you can create your own by having an existing fixture refurbished by a lighting specialist.

Task lighting need not be humdrum shaded fixtures. Pendant onion lights illuminate all the good that goes on in the kitchen below, designed by Pinemar Inc. and T. Keller Donovan. When you’re selecting a chain length, just make sure you have enough clearance between the countertop surface and the bottom of the fixture; 28 to 34 inches is standard.

via Gable Building Corp

via Gable Building Corp

Although subtle, the onion pendant steals the show in Gable Building Corp.’s elegant Boston bathroom. A pendant fixture on a lengthy chain lights a staircase by Whitten Architects, but also aligns with the surrounding windows so you can see it from outside as well. Su Casa Design‘s onion light hung over a dining table is a wonderful low-key chandelier.

Most onion lights are available with a clear, seeded or optical glass globe.The clear glass is the most traditional way to go. Nick Paternostro of Yale Appliance + Lighting adds that seeded glass offers the extra benefit of texture and does not show water spots from rain on any exposed fixtures. Optic glass offers a little more formal look and can create interesting reflection patterns.

Three – Decorative Accessories

Onion lanterns are an unexpected accessory on a shelf or fireplace mantle. Here, a collection of lanterns in a bevy of styles, onion included, make it a memorable space.

via Fray Interiors

via Fray Interiors

Four – Offbeat Uses Outdoors

via Blue Sky Building Co.

via Blue Sky Building Co.

Still a staple on the porch, this onion light fan is cool in more ways than one. An onion light pendant fixture fixed to an arched garden door lights up a stone pathway designed by Timothy Lee Landscape Design.

When you’re selecting a new onion light, decide whether you want your fixture to patina, or darken, or maintain its original pristine appearance.

via Timothy Lee Landscape Design

via Timothy Lee Landscape Design

Most quality onion lights are made of either copper or brass. Some manufacturers offer their metal finishes in their natural, unprotected state, or with an already antiqued finish. Brass will darken and take on a bronze-like appearance, while copper will eventually turn a verdigris, or green color.

Antiqued finishes, whether indoors or out, will continue to darken over time. In contrast, black finishes are typically painted on or powder-coated. As these finishes are added topically, they will eventually flake off to expose the underlying metal, especially if used outdoors.

If you live on or near the coastline, the sea air will speed up the patina process, with noticeable changes in just two or three months. For purposes of durability, brass is recommended for marine locations by both Paternostro and Anna Williams of Barn Light Electric Company.

Prices for onion lights vary greatly, from $50 to around $450. As the adage goes, you get what you pay for. The less expensive fixtures are usually made overseas using lower quality materials.

American-made onion lights are generally constructed of high-quality materials like brass and copper and are worth the investment.

Related Links & Sources:

Barn Electric Light Company

Yale Appliance + Lighting

Sandwich Lantern

Northeast Lantern

 

Heavy Metal: Warm is Now ‘Cool’

Pacific Heights project by Randy Thueme Design

Pacific Heights project by Randy Thueme Design

Ushering in a new fall season, warm-toned metals have made their way back into design after a decade long dominance of cool stainless steels, chromes and nickels.  Copper, brass and gold are appearing as feature architectural materials, as well as key finishes in furniture, lighting and decorative accessories.

Offering a more earthy presence compared to its cooler counterparts, warm-toned metals enhance both contemporary and traditional spaces. Cool metals, stainless steel in particular, have typically been associated with a more modern, contemporary aesthetic.

Memorial Park kitchen by Laura U Interior Design

Memorial Park kitchen by Laura U Interior Design

It doesn’t need to be exclusively one way the other; mixing warm and cool metals is a great choice. The contrast between the metals create the added benefit of a focal point, or visual pop. The Tom Dixon copper light shades in the kitchen by Laura U Interior Design (left) wouldn’t have the same punch if not surrounded by the frosty aura of white and stainless steel.

On the other hand, use warm-toned metals sparingly. Gold, for example, can go a long way in a room, and too much is just that – too much.

Here are some favorite pieces and applications:

Oly San Francisco Shelf, Coco Republic

Oly San Francisco Shelf, Coco Republic

Copper bath by Diamond Spas at Kukio Estate, Hawaii by Saint Dizier Design

Copper bath by Diamond Spas at Kukio Estate, Hawaii by Saint Dizier Design

Copper fireplace wall by Four Corners Construction

Copper fireplace wall by Four Corners Construction

Steampunk bathroom design by Andre Rothblatt

Steampunk bathroom design by Andre Rothblatt

Tower House, NYC by PMW Architects

Tower House Kitchen, NYC by PMW Architects

Polyedres by Hubert Le Gall, © photo Bruno SIMON

Polyedres by Hubert le Gall, © photo Bruno SIMON

Copper wall in San Francisco residence Game Room by The Wiseman Group

Copper wall in San Francisco residence media room by The Wiseman Group

Pythagoras Table Lamp by Mary McDonald - available through Robert Abbey

Pythagoras Table Lamp by Mary McDonald, made by Robert Abbey

D'Or Vase by Ayers

D’or Vase by Ayers Collection

Copper 1x1 3D Block by Daltile

Copper 1×1 3D Block by Daltile

Glam Grass Wallcovering Collection by Phillip Jeffries

Glam Grass Wallcovering Collection by Phillip Jeffries

Source links:

Randy Thueme Design via Houzz

Laura U Interior Design

 Coco Republic

Andre Rothblatt Architecture via Houzz

Saint Dizier Design via Houzz

Four Corners Construction via Houzz

PMW Architects via Houzz

The Wiseman Group via Houzz

Hubert le Gall via 1stdibs

Pythagoras Table Lamp by Mary McDonald via Lightopia

Ayers via Houzz

Glam Grass Collection by Phillip Jeffries

Natural Beauty: Biophilic Design Connects Nature and the Built Environment

Hanging Garden at 158 Cecil Street by AgFacadesign, Singapore

Hanging Garden at 158 Cecil Street by AgFacadesign, Singapore

“If we surrendered to earth’s intelligence we could rise up rooted, like trees.” – Rainer Maria Rilke

As Rilke’s writing suggests, we­­­ have much to learn from nature, and in accepting so we are strengthened. A synthesis of biology, architecture, and psychology, the importance of biophilic design is gaining recognition in importance in the built environment – from urban planning, to architecture and interior design.

In his 1984 book Biophilia, naturalist Edward O. Wilson defined biophilia as the inherent human inclination to affiliate with nature. Wilson’s theory proposes that the strong bonds we have with nature are rooted in our genetics as a mode of evolutionary survival.

Social ecologist Stephen Kellert, who further developed the concept of biophilia, pointed out as humans evolved, the context for our physical and mental development was primarily a sensory world governed by environmental features such as light, sound, scent, wind, weather, water, vegetation, animals and landscapes.

Although humans are no longer largely dependent on these natural components for daily survival, research has concluded that a connection to nature in our built environment still remains vital to human physical and mental well-being. Biophilic components in our built environments have been shown to lower blood pressure, heart rate, levels of anxiety, and increase mental focus, to name a few. The benefits to quality of life, health, and humanity as a whole are limitless.

Varia Ecoresin Nature Gallery panel Birch by 3form

Varia Ecoresin Nature Gallery panel Birch by 3form

A study by architect Ihab Elzeyadi attributed a sizable 10% of workplace absences to architecture with no connection to nature, as highlighted in The Economics of Biophilia: Why Designing with Nature in Mind Makes Financial Sense, a publication by environmental consulting firm Terrapin Bright Green.

In Elzeyadi’s study, 30% of offices overlooked a manicured landscape with trees and had natural daylighting; 31% overlooked a street, and the remaining 39% had no outside view.  Elzeyadi found that the quality of employees’ view from their offices considerably affected their work behavior. Not only did the employees with the nature view take less sick leave, they were also happier and more productive.

Likewise, evidence-based healthcare designer Dr. Roger Ulrich found hospital patients with a bedside view of trees recovered faster than those assigned to identical rooms with a view of a brick wall.  The patients with the nature view required significantly fewer doses of strong pain medication, had shorter hospitalization duration, and experienced lower levels of stress than those with the wall view.

“There are many factors that influence and trigger stress, but the built environment can act as a stress reliever for outside stresses, as well as independently trigger positive physiological reactions. Thus, a biophilic built environment can provide positive distractions,” noted Terrapin Bright Green.

So, how does biophilic design relate to our constructed surroundings?  In Biophilic Design: The Theory, Science and Practice of Bringing Buildings to Life, the book’s co-author Stephen Kellert identified a new design paradigm. Restorative environmental design, he explained, is an approach that fosters a beneficial contact between people and nature in modern buildings and landscapes, with a focus on low environmental impact.

Kellert identifies two cornerstones of biophilic design in the built environment. One is an organic or natural dimension, which directly, indirectly or symbolically represent forms from nature. Examples include daylighting, potted plants or plantings and imagery of nature.

Place-based or vernacular is the second dimension, described by Kellert as the “spirit of place”. Our tendency towards territory and to affiliate with a location reflects our inherent need to call some place home.  Kellert argued that attachment to a place promotes stewardship to its buildings and landscape.  He adds: “An erosion of connection to place has unfortunately become a common affliction of modern society”. Fortunately, implementation of biophilic design practices are helping to regain lost ground.

The two underpinnings of biophilic design are attributed to six basic design elements and several associated design attributes identified by Kellert.  While many are obvious, such as natural light, ventilation and materials, others recall more primitive roots and challenge tenants of modern architecture – shapes that contest right angles, materials that show age with patina, and a preference for delineated rather than open spaces.

641 Avenue of the Americas, New York City by ©COOKFOX Architects

641 Avenue of the Americas, New York City by ©COOKFOX Architects

Architecture purposefully designed to capitalize on natural views is one of the most widely incorporated biophilic attribute – a visual connection with nature. COOKFOX Architects’ design of office space in New York developed a green rooftop to serve as a natural view from the office, amidst the dense urban backdrop of Manhattan. Additionally, employees access to the garden and maintained it, experiencing a layered connection to it in a physical context rather than a purely visual one. It’s a perfect example of Kellert’s restorative environmental design.

Likewise, in the interior of the SC Johnson Administrative Building in Racine, Wisconsin, USA, architect Frank Lloyd Wright designed dendriform columnar supports in the interior to abstractly reference the form of trees. Although nearly 80 years old, Wright’s 1936 design characterizes one of the biophilic attributes of simulating the natural form of the tree, which offers psychological affiliations of resource and refuge.

Whereas the architectural design of a new building presents vast opportunity to implement biophilic features in its spatial design, existing spaces present more limitations. Connections to nature must be achieved primarily through interior finishes and fixtures.

SkyCeiling installation at Dorostkar Dentistry, California. Photographs  by Sky Factory, copyright 2013

SkyCeiling installation at Dorostkar Dentistry, California. Photograph by Sky Factory, copyright 2013

International company The Sky Factory offers a luminous SkyCeiling, which provides a realistic illusion of a scenic sky throughfaux ceiling-mounted windows.  The product is a backlit grid of translucent panels with a high-resolution transparent photograph mounted on a modular aluminum grid.  Full-spectrum fluorescent T5 lamps between the ceiling and the transparency provide the back lighting.

Various scenes are available, including specific cloud formations, and wisps of flowering branches and particular tree types. Although SkyCeiling has programmable and dimmable features to brighten and dim on a daily or seasonal cycle, its imagery is stagnant.

SkyV, also by The Sky Factory, uses a similar setup to SkyCeiling, but improves upon it by utilizing three hinged LED edge-lit LCD monitors to broadcast RED Digital Cinema HD content.  SkyV’s non-repeating footage highlights wind blowing treetops, and the subtle evolution of the sky over the course of one to three hours.  It provides a richer experience with natural movement.

According to company founder Bill Witherspoon, “We convince the mind that there’s a real skylight up there. Once the mind is convinced, it triggers a psychophysiological response…a powerful sense of ease and well-being”.  The effect is undeniably realistic.

Meanwhile, textile designer David Oakey’s carpet designs for Interface employ nature-based patterns. Oakey’s recent Urban Retreat collection is sorted into pattern studies of natural textures and organic forms, such as flax, grass, lichen and granite.

An interview with Oakey revealed his inspiration for Urban Retreat was the past decade’s global population shift of people returning to cities from rural areas.  He recalls a time when the word ‘urban’ evoked images decay and concrete jungles with little respite. However, this shift is different.  He explained: “Only this time, city dwellers are bringing part of that non-urban heritage – part of nature – with them. Globally, people are turning in to their instinctive, almost primal, need to reconnect and coexist with nature.”

Interface will soon introduce Oakey’s newest design in its Net Effect carpet collection.  Its design references ocean waves and their connection to the beach and the landscape.

Net Effect carpet tiles in Atlantic & Pacific, created by David Oakey for Interface

Net Effect carpet tiles in Atlantic & Pacific, created by David Oakey for Interface

Oakey disclosed the inspiration for Net Effect was the color blue.  He identifies blue as the most popular color globally.  It is also echoed in The World Is Blue by Sylvia A. Earle, a book which he said describes the environmental fate of our oceans.  Constructed of yarns from recycled Filipino fishnets, Net Effect binds us together physically, metaphorically and supports biophilia’s premise of sustainability.

Biophilia isn’t new. Humankind has always held a strong connection to nature, yet modern, industrialized society also encouraged distance from it.  Biophilia still remains a developing field of its own. However, its far-reaching benefits and application particularly in the built environment are becoming widely recognized.  As David Oakey put it, it’s no longer considered on the “eco-fringe” of the design world.

*Article previously published in Commercial Interior Design magazine, August 2013 issue. 

Rex Ray: Art Meets Design

Infused Veneer Panel-Type and Ovals via B+N Industries

Infused Veneer Panel-Type and Ovals via B+N Industries

Rex Ray doesn’t typically come to mind when one thinks of interior design.  Trained in the fine arts, he’s renowned for his collages, paintings and innovative graphic design work.  Ray has created work for Apple, Sony, DreamWorks and designed music tour posters for The Rolling Stones, U2, and REM, among others.

With its retro edge, his playful work easily lends itself to re-interpretation in the interior design industry. Capitalizing on his graphic appeal, Rex Ray has designed a number of home furnishing products brandishing his namesake.

Ranging from architectural wall panels, furniture, pillows,wall decals, light fixtures and wall tile, Rex Ray’s artistic vision can find a home in your home.  Check out some favorites:

Rex Ray Bench via B+N Industries

Rex Ray Bench via B+N Industries

Infused Veneer Panel-Ellipse and Waves Closeup via B+N Industries

Infused Veneer Panel-Ellipse and Waves (detail) via B+N Industries

Iconic Ellipse Panel via B+N Industries

Iconic Ellipse Panel via B+N Industries

Skyline Rhythm wall decal via Blik

Skyline Rhythm wall decal via Blik

Go Beyond the Borough wall decal via Blik

Go Beyond the Borough wall decal via Blik

Paper Cut Lamp via Rex Ray R2Shop

Paper Cut Lamp via Rex Ray R2Shop

Rex Ray Type Black & White tile via modwalls

Rex Ray Type Black & White tile via modwalls

Rex Ray Type black tile detail via modwalls

Rex Ray Type black tile detail via modwalls

Abylida Pillow via Rex Ray R2Shop

Abylida Pillow via Rex Ray R2Shop

Rex Ray_1671 pillow via DQtrs

Rex Ray_1671 pillow via DQtrs

 Sources:

B+N Industries

Blik

modwalls

Rex Ray R2Shop

DQtrs

 

 

Mobile Lighting Fixtures: Seen in a New Light

As open-plan living and working spaces continue to gain popularity, it’s clear we seek out flexibility. Delineated areas for singular functions are fading away.  Living rooms double as working and eating areas, as do kitchens. Mobility is king.  Adaptability doesn’t only apply to contemporary space planning; light fixture designs are making the move too.

Highlighted below is a selection of fixtures that were designed to be mobile.   Blurring traditional labels of  ‘table lamp’ or a ‘floor lamp’, they are objects in and of themselves.  Often created with handles or grips, or without conventional bases, their designs capitalize on their ability to be fluid… to be moved on a whim.

28d by Bocci

28d by Bocci

Instead of designing form itself, Bocci’s creative director, Omer Arbel, sought simplicity, resulting in a complex glass blowing technique where air pressure is intermittently introduced into and removed, then rapidly heated and cooled. The result is a distorted spherical shape with a composed collection of inner “satellites”, one of which is made of opaque milk glass.  The 28d fixture was designed to sit on a horizontal surface.  Its flexible grey crochet memory cable is intended to be coiled into a sculptural pattern to provide a cushioned surface on which the glass sits.  28d has a low voltage (12V, 20Watt xenon) bulb.  www.bocci.ca

Anisha by Lievore Molina for Foscarini

Anisha by Lievore Molina for Foscarini

Collaboration between Italian lighting brand Foscarini and Barcelona-based Lievore Molina culminated in a spare, elliptical lamp design which “outlines and empty space, defines it and fills it with its light, producing a magical sensation”.   Anisha was inspired by the idea of an eternal object with a simple form that transforms when its frame is immersed in light.  Anisha is operated by a dimmer touch switch, which honors its seamless design.  www.foscarini.com

Cesta by Miguel Mila for Santa & Cole

Cesta by Miguel Mila for Santa & Cole

A  classic 1964 design by Spanish Miguel Mila is an enchanting cherry wood lantern with an inner light globe.  Cesta’s handle makes it an object-lamp, suitable for tabletops or floors. www.santacole.com

Falling In Love by Tobias-Grau, Form+Function

Falling In Love by Tobias-Grau, Form+Function

Falling In Love is described as “small and brilliant, a ball of light in a nest”.   Intriguingly flexible, the fixture is comfortable on shelf, on the floor, on a console, or illuminating pictures. Its powerful LED bulbs are dimmable and offer excellent color rendering. www.formplusfunction.net

Piramide by Gandia Blasco

Piramide by Gandia Blasco

Designed by José A. Gandía-Blasco, the pyramid-shaped fixture features clean lines and a contemporary, triangular shape.  Piramide is made of rotationally molded polyethelene for outdoor use and will stand up to harsh environments, hot or cold.  The all-weather outdoor fluorescent light is perfect for indoors, as well as the garden, pool, or beach.  www.gandiablasco.com

Tokonomo by Serfaty and Tovim for Aqua Creations

Tokonomo by Serfaty and Tovim for Aqua Creations

Inspired by Tokonoma, a Japanese style reception area in which objects for natural and artistic appreciation and inspiration are displayed, the lamps capture the spirit of these objects.  Handmade felt shades made from wool and silk are available in four different finishes, each representing one of the four seasons ; Haru for Spring, Natsu for Summer, Aki for Autumn and Fuyu for winter. The lamps are powered by digitally dimmable LEDs and operated and controlled by touch. www.aquagallery.com

Truncheon Floor Light by CMMNWLTH

Truncheon Floor Light by CMMNWLTH for MATTER

Faithful to its namesake, the compact club form is created from traditional materials, but advanced by digital technology.  The wooden fixture is custom CNC milled; trace lathe markings leave textured markings on the surface of the wood.  Offsetting the warm wood enclosure is the cool light of integrated LED bulbs. Truncheon was designed by the New York based studio CMMNWLTH to rest against the wall.  www.mattermatters.com

Toobe by Ferruccio Laviani for Kartell

Toobe by Ferruccio Laviani for Kartell

Designed by Ferruccio Laviani, the Toobe lamp originated in the notion that a single acrylic PMMP (“acrylic glass”) extruded tube could function as either a table lamp or a floor lamp, depending on the length. Designed with an integrated slotted handle, it was designed to be moved easily. Toobe is available in five transparent, colorful hues. www.kartellstorela.com

 

Fragile Future III Light By Drift

FRAGILE FUTURE III, image by inhabitat.com

Dandelion seeds and electricity have been made unlikely companions in the breathtaking chandelier Fragile Future III.  As Drift designers Ralph Nauta and Lonneke Gordijn reveal “two extremes have made a pact to survive”.   Fragile Future III reinforces the designers’ continuing dialogue on the “amalgamation of nature and technology”.

The base of the fixture is a concrete block from which LED lights have been anchored by a geometric, yet airy metal frame.  Hundreds of dandelion seeds have been painstakingly adhered around each LED light, encasing it in a delicate and captivating seed cloud.  One module consists of a visible circuit and three ‘Dandelights’, which is an alternative single-dandelion version of the fixture. The Fragile Future III system is fashioned to easily attach to an adjacent section, allowing for unlimited configurations of multiple modules.

FRAGILE FUTURE III, image by Carpenters Workshop Gallery

Fragile Future III, as its name implies, is the third version of the collection.  Its predecessors, Fragile Future I and II, were incapable of forming 3D compositions, and were more fragile than their successor.

Fragile Future III is a collaborative project between Drift and the London based Carpenters Workshop Gallery.  Fixtures are purchased through Carpenters Workshop Gallery. Fragile Future III won the Moet Hennessy Prize at the Pavilion of Art & Design London in 2010.

Drift presented the Fragile Future III collection recently at Dubai Design Days, March 18-21, 2012. Drift is an Amsterdam-based company founded in 2006 by Ralph Nauta and Lonneke Gordijn. www.STUDIODRIFT.com

More about Drift

”In this time of information overload and exaggerated senses, we hope that our work emphasizes the metaphysical quality of human sensations, that it establishes a point of balance in the midst of the contradictions of daily life, and that it stresses immaterial – spiritual and emotional – values.  Because of these goals, light has been one of our favourite mediums; light expresses emotions in a very direct way”. – Ralph Nauta and Lonneke Gordijn

Since 2006 their work has been exhibited at leading museums and fairs worldwide, including the Victoria & Albert Museum London, Museum of Arts & Design New York, World Expo Shanghai, Design / Miami, Salone del Mobile Milan, Design Week Tokyo and Design Act Moscow.

Shylight By Drift

SHYLIGHT, image by xmara.com

We typically don’t have a physical dialogue with our light fixtures. However, designers at Drift have created a brilliant lighting collection called Shylight that cleverly marries technology, nature and human interface to create a memorable, poetic experience.

Shylights are lamps housed in a metal ‘cocoon’ that are activated to descend and expose billowy silk folds, like a flower unfolding in the sun. Turning the fixture on activates a system of springs, triggering movement of the lamps. By switching the fixture off, the lamp retracts back into its enclosure.  The end result is an ephemeral, luminous dance.

The designers cite “Inspiration for creating the Shylights comes from the fact that everything in nature, whether it is flora or fauna, is constantly moving and changing; it is alive! Shyness, fear, pride and hope, we not only see in humans and animals, but in a more subtle form in plants and flowers.”

The lamp brightness and the speed at which the lamps move are programmable and controlled by an iPhone or iPad. Additionally, the lamps, available in three different ‘species’, can be choreographed to perform to music. Materials used in the lamps include stainless steel, aluminum, silk fabric and high-power LED lamps.

Drift presented the Shylight collection recently at Dubai Design Days, March 18-21, 2012. Drift is an Amsterdam-based company founded in 2006 by Ralph Nauta and Lonneke Gordijn. www.STUDIODRIFT.com

view video of Shylight

More About Drift

”In this time of information overload and exaggerated senses, we hope that our work emphasizes the metaphysical quality of human sensations, that it establishes a point of balance in the midst of the contradictions of daily life, and that it stresses immaterial – spiritual and emotional – values.  Because of these goals, light has been one of our favourite mediums; light expresses emotions in a very direct way”. – Ralph Nauta and Lonneke Gordijn

Since 2006 their work has been exhibited at leading museums and fairs worldwide, including the Victoria & Albert Museum London, Museum of Arts & Design New York, World Expo Shanghai, Design / Miami, Salone del Mobile Milan, Design Week Tokyo and Design Act Moscow.