Picture Perfect: Six Ways to Display Artwork

via Katie Ridder Rooms

via Katie Ridder Rooms

Can’t wait to display that collection of pictures but are hung up on how to hang it? Do you opt for a more conservative, symmetrical route or something more haphazard? Are the pictures all the same size, or do they vary? Do the frames match or are they different? Hang on! Take a look at six different approaches to display artwork:

1-LINEAR  – Pictures are hung in a line –  either horizontally or vertically.  This style emphasizes rhythm and balance.  It works especially well with pieces that are the same size and are framed with the same frame. Kenneth Brown Design‘s dining room example below utilizes a gallery style hanging system to maintain uniformity and adds an industrial edge.

Overlapping frames of two different sizes in Bria Hammel Interiors‘ bedroom design mimics the horizontal thrust of the bed’s headboard.

via Kenneth Brown Design

via Kenneth Brown Design

via Bria Hammel Interiors

via Bria Hammel Interiors

2-GRID  Like the linear approach, the grid configuration also lends itself to artwork of the same size and frame. Pictures can be hung either close together, as in Patrick Sutton & Associates‘ design – or with more breathing room between each frame, like in Alun & Selena Urquhart’s charming coffee station. 

via Alun & Selena Urquhart, photo by Sarah Greenman

via  Sara Greenman, Alun & Selena Urquhart’s TX home

via Patrick Sutton Associates, photo by Erik Kvaslsvik

via Patrick Sutton Associates, photo by Erik Kvaslsvik

3-CLUSTERED  If a freer approach is your preference, consider clustering your artwork in a loosely defined area. Maintaining a consistent distance between the larger pieces and filling voids in with smaller pictures still maintains visual balance without being symmetrical. Kevin Corn Design makes great with horizontal black and white images, all with varying black frames. Meanwhile, ILevel Inc.‘s installation brings together very diverse pieces in a more organic configuration.

via Design*Sponge, Design by Kevin Corn Design

via Design*Sponge, Design by Kevin Corn Design

via ILevel Inc.

via ILevel Inc.

4-SALON STYLE – Salon Style is truly old school.Think of 18th century Academic paintings on display at the Louvre. This bold style is popular again. Salon Style is characterized by a floor to ceiling, wall to wall frenzy of artwork hung tightly together. Sizes differ greatly, as do the frames and artwork itself, although chunky gesso and gilt frames do look great. The effect is one of joyous randomness.

via Design*Sponge, via Clara Zangenberg

via Design*Sponge, via Clara Zangenberg

via Stacy Weiss, photo by Adrienne DeRosa Photography

via Stacy Weiss, photo by Adrienne DeRosa Photography

 5-SHELF – Pictures aren’t hung on the wall, but leaned on an architectural feature, such as a shelf. If you like to change your artwork frequently, aren’t handy with a hammer or have space constraints, this is a good alternative. The shelf approach also offers an added opportunity to layer smaller frames in front of larger ones.

via Roger Hirsch Architects

via Roger Hirsch Architects

via Marcia Prentice Photography

via Marcia Prentice Photography

6-FLOOR – Placing artwork on the floor and leaning it against the wall offers the same flexibility as the shelf approach. However, it does have a calculated romantic casualness about it that, in my opinion, impairs any true informal intent. If you’re not clumsy and are looking for a dramatic display, this may be a good solution. The floor approach doesn’t work on wall to wall carpet; it will unfortunately look like you just moved in.

via anordinarywoman.net

via anordinarywoman.net

via Mark Dodge Design

via Mark Dodge Design

Thank you for viewing!

Related links:

Bria Hammel Interiors

ILevel Inc.

Katie Ridder Rooms

Kenneth Brown Design

Kevin Corn Design

Mark Dodge Design

Marcia Prentice Photography

Patrick Sutton Associates

Roger Hirsch Architects

Sarah Greenman Photography

Stacey Weiss

Heavy Metal: Warm is Now ‘Cool’

Pacific Heights project by Randy Thueme Design

Pacific Heights project by Randy Thueme Design

Ushering in a new fall season, warm-toned metals have made their way back into design after a decade long dominance of cool stainless steels, chromes and nickels.  Copper, brass and gold are appearing as feature architectural materials, as well as key finishes in furniture, lighting and decorative accessories.

Offering a more earthy presence compared to its cooler counterparts, warm-toned metals enhance both contemporary and traditional spaces. Cool metals, stainless steel in particular, have typically been associated with a more modern, contemporary aesthetic.

Memorial Park kitchen by Laura U Interior Design

Memorial Park kitchen by Laura U Interior Design

It doesn’t need to be exclusively one way the other; mixing warm and cool metals is a great choice. The contrast between the metals create the added benefit of a focal point, or visual pop. The Tom Dixon copper light shades in the kitchen by Laura U Interior Design (left) wouldn’t have the same punch if not surrounded by the frosty aura of white and stainless steel.

On the other hand, use warm-toned metals sparingly. Gold, for example, can go a long way in a room, and too much is just that – too much.

Here are some favorite pieces and applications:

Oly San Francisco Shelf, Coco Republic

Oly San Francisco Shelf, Coco Republic

Copper bath by Diamond Spas at Kukio Estate, Hawaii by Saint Dizier Design

Copper bath by Diamond Spas at Kukio Estate, Hawaii by Saint Dizier Design

Copper fireplace wall by Four Corners Construction

Copper fireplace wall by Four Corners Construction

Steampunk bathroom design by Andre Rothblatt

Steampunk bathroom design by Andre Rothblatt

Tower House, NYC by PMW Architects

Tower House Kitchen, NYC by PMW Architects

Polyedres by Hubert Le Gall, © photo Bruno SIMON

Polyedres by Hubert le Gall, © photo Bruno SIMON

Copper wall in San Francisco residence Game Room by The Wiseman Group

Copper wall in San Francisco residence media room by The Wiseman Group

Pythagoras Table Lamp by Mary McDonald - available through Robert Abbey

Pythagoras Table Lamp by Mary McDonald, made by Robert Abbey

D'Or Vase by Ayers

D’or Vase by Ayers Collection

Copper 1x1 3D Block by Daltile

Copper 1×1 3D Block by Daltile

Glam Grass Wallcovering Collection by Phillip Jeffries

Glam Grass Wallcovering Collection by Phillip Jeffries

Source links:

Randy Thueme Design via Houzz

Laura U Interior Design

 Coco Republic

Andre Rothblatt Architecture via Houzz

Saint Dizier Design via Houzz

Four Corners Construction via Houzz

PMW Architects via Houzz

The Wiseman Group via Houzz

Hubert le Gall via 1stdibs

Pythagoras Table Lamp by Mary McDonald via Lightopia

Ayers via Houzz

Glam Grass Collection by Phillip Jeffries

The Finest Kind: Swans Island Company

_1-signThere’s an expression in Maine used to describe something of top quality or appreciation – finest kind. Maker of iconic blankets, throws and other delights, the Swans Island Company of Northport, Maine is worthy of this vernacular accolade. Swans Island is so special because it invests the time and skill to make products by hand, and make them well.

I had the pleasure of meeting with Bill Laurita, president and general manager, to learn about the company’s time-honored process of making blankets, scarves, yarn and accessories.  Bill also gave me a personal tour of their space. Housed in a 1780s cape style home with exposed beams and wood plank floors, the showroom’s ambiance resembles a cozy bed and breakfast more than a company headquarters and workroom.

Glass jars filled with natural dyestuffs, such as red madder, various roots, and cochineal, which is actually a little insect that yields a powerful crimson-colored dye, greet visitors at its front entrance.

Bill then filled me in about fleece.  Explaining the cross between a Lincoln and a Merino sheep, at first I thought he was starting off with a joke.  Humor aside, the outcome of this encounter in animal husbandry is the famed Corriedale, bred for its soft fleece. Corriedales vary from light to dark in color.

Swans Island’s prized fleece is washed in organic soap and spun by an spinnery in Putney, Vermont.  Bill pointed out this process maintains the lanolin in the wool, which gives the yarn its softness. In contrast, harsh synthetic washing strips the lanolin from the fiber and weakens it. Fleece is then spun on varial spinning frames, which creates wonderfully diverse yarn with a slubby thickness. Fleece is spun as natural-colored, a blended grey made of white and dark fleece, or a chocolately brown, coined as ‘rare’.

A beautiful shot of the showroom

A beautiful shot of the showroom

The cones of yarn are sent back to Swans Island, where they are formed into skeins. If the skeins are to be dyed, they’re done so in small lots.  It’s time-consuming, but dyeing in this way produces yarn with the greatest loft, or fluffiness and is the least intrusive method.  Bill pointed out, “The company’s decision was to go with what’s the best way to do this, not the cheapest.”

Each dye batch is one-of-a-kind, with a wide range of tonal value and color variation.  Bill explained how much dye the wool takes and the disparity between dye materials themselves are affected by weather, annual rainfall, and soil conditions, to name a few. Design by nature, so to speak. Color variation is actually desired by Swans Island, as uniformity is associated with synthetic dyes and dreaded commercial sameness.

Sometimes a color comes out other than what it was intended to, but Swans Island considers it a happy accident and sells it as a second.  With a repertoire of 30 standard colors, I was fortunate to see Tony, one of the dyers, stirring a vat of cutch (an Asian plant) and logwood that was to be over-dyed with indigo overnight and then dipped in an iron bath.  Custom colors (custom anything, really) is possible.

Dye material on display at entrance

Dye material on display at entrance

Laura, one of the weavers, was midway in skillfully weaving a blanket on one of four air-assisted hand looms. The hand looms create an over-under weave to slowly bring the piece to life. “It’s a simple weave that creates a simple product,” Bill added.  What’s not simple are the 3,456 hand-tied knots that have to be contended with when changing over the machine.

Laura will also over-weave the logo in by hand, which is an abstracted, blocky abbreviation of the company’s name.

Traditional striped and checked woven patterns are Swans Island’s mainstay. Checked patterns are actually winter weight, a double-weave blanket that creates air pockets, like a quilt.  The pockets act as insulation, creating heat within the pockets while wicking moisture away from the skin. Summer weight blankets are soft, light and airy – perfect for cozying up on a porch on a chilly evening.

Weaving isn’t the final process. In charge of finishing, Louise straightens the edges, pick out chaff (little bits not removed in cleaning of the fleece) with surgical tweezers while Becky trims up the logo and adds any customized hand-embroidery.  The piece is then soaked in water, spun out and blocked on an antique lace stretcher to dry. Linen storage packaging with built-in aromatic cedar planks are the final destination for these modern-day heirlooms.

Swans Island Company has deep roots – not just in Maine, where it’s been in operation since 1992, but rather in its honor of nature and tradition.  “It’s infused into everything we make.”

link: Swans Island Company

making skeins

making skeins

skeins

skeins

dyed samples

dyed samples

_5-tying

Laura weaving

Laura weaving

detail of logo

detail of logo

blanket on stretcher for finishing

blanket on stretcher for finishing

A view of the main showroom

A view of the main showroom

Natural grey throws

Natural grey throws

Rare wool throws

Rare wool throws

Variegated solid throws

Variegated solid throws

Sweater and knitting yarn

Sweater and knitting yarn

Crates of knitting yarn

Crates of knitting yarn

Baby blankets and pillows

Baby blankets and pillows

Throw pillows and elegant shawl

Throw pillows and wrap

Elegant packaging

Elegant packaging

Front door to Swans Island Company's 1780's farmhouse showroom

Front door to Swans Island Company’s 1780’s farmhouse showroom

Repurposed Barn Doors: Bringing the Outside In

Barn doors are cool. Their weathered patina and heavy utility appeals to the soul. Associated with the rural outdoors, they are a piece of history that breathes life into otherwise potentially bland indoor spaces.  Spanning from divine bovine to sleek and chic, they masterfully complement a multitude of spaces, from rustic to contemporary.

Aesthetics aren’t their only attribute. Sliding mechanisms on barn doors save space by eliminating the need to accommodate for a door swing – a great solution for narrow spaces.  Barn doors aren’t only repurposed as doors.  Also taking the form of artwork, room dividers and bed headboards, their applications are as plentiful as a bountiful harvest.

Slide on down to view some great examples:

via atlantahomesmag.com

via atlantahomesmag.com

via Elle Decor by Darryl Carter

via Elle Decor by Darryl Carter

via atticmag.com

via atticmag.com

via Hutker Architects

via Hutker Architects

via remodelista.com

via remodelista.com

via Modern Country

via Modern Country

via Brooklyn Home Co.

via Brooklyn Home Co.

via Design Sponge

via Design Sponge

via House Beautiful

via House Beautiful

via Pinterest

via Southern Living

via Southern Living

via Vicki Gladle-Bolick-Bolick Interiors

via Vicki Gladle-Bolick-Bolick Interiors

via Pinterest, source unknown

via Pinterest, source unknown

via Elle Decor by Darryl Carter

via Elle Decor by Darryl Carter

via Nest Design LLC

via Nest Design LLC

 

Rex Ray: Art Meets Design

Infused Veneer Panel-Type and Ovals via B+N Industries

Infused Veneer Panel-Type and Ovals via B+N Industries

Rex Ray doesn’t typically come to mind when one thinks of interior design.  Trained in the fine arts, he’s renowned for his collages, paintings and innovative graphic design work.  Ray has created work for Apple, Sony, DreamWorks and designed music tour posters for The Rolling Stones, U2, and REM, among others.

With its retro edge, his playful work easily lends itself to re-interpretation in the interior design industry. Capitalizing on his graphic appeal, Rex Ray has designed a number of home furnishing products brandishing his namesake.

Ranging from architectural wall panels, furniture, pillows,wall decals, light fixtures and wall tile, Rex Ray’s artistic vision can find a home in your home.  Check out some favorites:

Rex Ray Bench via B+N Industries

Rex Ray Bench via B+N Industries

Infused Veneer Panel-Ellipse and Waves Closeup via B+N Industries

Infused Veneer Panel-Ellipse and Waves (detail) via B+N Industries

Iconic Ellipse Panel via B+N Industries

Iconic Ellipse Panel via B+N Industries

Skyline Rhythm wall decal via Blik

Skyline Rhythm wall decal via Blik

Go Beyond the Borough wall decal via Blik

Go Beyond the Borough wall decal via Blik

Paper Cut Lamp via Rex Ray R2Shop

Paper Cut Lamp via Rex Ray R2Shop

Rex Ray Type Black & White tile via modwalls

Rex Ray Type Black & White tile via modwalls

Rex Ray Type black tile detail via modwalls

Rex Ray Type black tile detail via modwalls

Abylida Pillow via Rex Ray R2Shop

Abylida Pillow via Rex Ray R2Shop

Rex Ray_1671 pillow via DQtrs

Rex Ray_1671 pillow via DQtrs

 Sources:

B+N Industries

Blik

modwalls

Rex Ray R2Shop

DQtrs

 

 

The Fireplace: From Necessity to Nostalgia?

via CWB Architects

As Christmas quickly approaches, I daydream of spending a blustery winter evening roasting marshmallows in a toasty fireplace.  Despite living in a Middle Eastern desert with balmy winter weather and turquoise water, the nostalgia for a garland-trimmed fireplace at Christmastime tugs at my heart strings.   I’m not alone.  A fireplace is often a “must” for homebuyers.  Even Cicero quoted sometime in the first century BC, “There is no place more delightful than one’s own fireplace”.

While the fireplace has primarily become an aesthetic fixture from which Christmas stockings are hung and family photos showcased, this wasn’t always the case.   The popularity of centrally heated ranch-style houses surged in the 1940s and 50s, displacing the fireplace as a supplementary ornament instead of a primary source of heat.

Let’s be thankful we didn’t live a thousand years ago.  From antiquity to the 1200s, open indoor fire pits were positioned in the middle of the room and vented by a hole in the roof.  Think of camping…but inside.  A technological leap in the 13th century shifted the fireplace from the center of the house to an exterior wall. An outdoor chimney clumsily vented smoke away from the building, enabling second stories to be built where previously not possible.

In 1796, a physicist named Count Rumsford designed a new fireplace where a tall, shallow firebox reflected more heat and streamlined exhaust.  This combination allowed the chimney to be incorporated into the wall of the home rather than attached to the exterior.  Rumford’s design has lasted, with modifications, ever since.   Mantels, which projected to catch escaping smoke, evolved from large looming hoods in medieval times to the decorative framework and shelf we know today.

Yet, for a so-called “accessory”, the fireplace still garners a lot of design attention.  Traditionally centered on a wall or in a corner, seating is typically arranged oriented with a command central focus towards the fireplace, even though it may be rarely (or ever) used.  Many fireboxes in old homes have been bricked up to prevent heat loss but are architecturally and functionally still the focus of the room. Contemporary settings tend to integrate the fireplace more asymmetrically in the space, but it still remains the visual highlight.

Worth noting, in recent years more homeowners are opting to heat their homes fully or partially with specialized wood or pellet stoves  in an effort to combat rising oil and gas prices….perhaps an interesting turnabout?

Nonetheless, man’s innate allure to fire and his ability to build has culminated in the creation of some delightful fireplaces.  For the simplicity of making us feel warm, both physically and emotionally, fireplaces make our houses homes. Here are a few favorites:

via Tracery Interiors

via lovely jolie

via Metalfire

via Lew French

via Debey Zito Design

via Bo Bendana

via Lewin Wertheimer Architect

via Schwartz and Architecture

Riad Farnatchi via Kiwi Collection

via Fine Woodworking

via CWB Architects

Source links:

Bo Bendana

CWB Architects

Debey Zito Design

Fine Woodworking

Kiwi Collection

Lew French

Lewin Wertheimer Architect

lovely jolie

Metalfire

Schwarts and Architecture

Tracery Interiors

 

Thank you to Fireplaces Magazine for some historical information on fireplaces.

 

 

 

 

 

Functional History: Repurposed Vintage Grain Sacks

 

“Bridlechair” using German grain sacks, 3 Fine Grains

Repurposed grain sacks have made a welcomed design appearance in the past couple of years, and it doesn’t seem to be a passing trend. Check out some more inspired applications of these old workhorses below, from upholstery to lampshades.  Grain sacks are inherently durable, pest-resistant and their understated, nubby texture is equally at home in rustic, traditional or contemporary spaces.

A fair quantity of vintage grain sack material is available, and prices vary depending on origin, rarity, quality, condition, etc.   For some background information to assist with your hunt… American grain sacks tend to be either thin or thicker cotton.  Thin cotton stock often has imagery dyed into the fabric. Conversely, thicker cotton sacks have imagery printed onto the face of the fabric and can have stripes sewn integrally in the bag fabric and are suitable for upholstery. Unfortunately, the thin cotton variety often fades and bleeds when washed while the thicker, printed selections are less likely to.

European grain sacks are highly prized and are heavier, made out of hemp or flax. The background colors vary (off-white to flax to grey) and demarcation markings, usually stripes, are sewn in the bag, sometimes with embroidered or stenciled initials.  Like lobster buoys and livestock branding, the markings visually signified the farm from which the sacks belonged, and allowed the bags to be re-circulated to the owner once the grain was deposited at the mill.

In particular, German grain sacks are considered the paragon of the grain sack world – they’re rarer (many didn’t survive the war) and a bit softer than other European sacks.  They  are stenciled in a tar-based black with the name of the farm and the date it was established and frequently an animal silhouette or decorate symbol associated with the farm.  German bags often show a number on the bag face for inventory purposes, 1 to 99.   Hand-painted bags pre-date the stenciled bags, usually prior to 1890.

One-of-a kind, these everyday relics are striking and enchanting repurposed into another form or simply as artwork in themselves.

 

Contacts:

www.myworld.ebay.com/loodylady

www.etsy.com/shop/3finegrains

www.stephanielloyd.com

www.legrenier.com.au/

www.lumadirect.com

www.antiquated.co.uk

www.etsy.com/shop/cottageintheoaks

www.etsy.com/shop/Sassyshades

www.hammersandhighheels.blogspot.com/2011/03/diy-tiered-grain-sack-window-shade.html

www.etsy.com/shop/jillbent

www.potterybarn.com

www.ballarddesigns.com

 

Special thanks for providing me with valuable background information, inspiration and imagery:

www.missmustardseed.com

www.sheilazellerinteriors.com

 

Denyse Schmidt Quilts: Art For Your Bed

“Drunk Love in a Log Cabin”, Signature Design

The first time I saw Denyse Schmidt’s quilts years ago, I felt as if I’d been pleasantly hit in the head by a hefty box of crayons.  A quilter myself, I’ve quietly followed her work, lurking online and admiring her spare, brilliant wizardry.  Often described as “painterly”, her exhilaratingly colorful, simple designs are reminiscent of Mark Rothko and Newman Barnett’s color field paintings of the 1960’s. Although abstract and decidedly “modern”, Schmidt’s designs are actually rooted in an American tradition when early quilts were utilitarian and elemental, in contrast to later pieces, which tended to be more carefully constructed, decorative heirlooms.

Schmidt discloses “…what inspired me to begin in the first place were quilts that were very old, but looked modern. Especially fifteen years ago when I started the business most people who were making contemporary quilts weren’t really referencing the simplicity or the limited color palette or the kind of quirkiness of some of those really old quilts.  That was the driving force for me-I felt like these (traditional) quilts would fit in a modern interior, they seemed like modern paintings to me….”1

Made of pre-washed cotton or wool, depending on the collection, the quilts are designed by and pieced in her Bridgeport, CT studio, occupying a historic building which was coincidentally previously home to the American Fabrics Company.  Schmidt works with a group of Minnesota Amish women to finely hand-quilt the Couture quilt line while the Works quilts are machine finished in the studio and offer a quicker lead time.  In spite of their artful spirit, the quilts are designed to be used as bed coverings.

Highly sought out, Schmidt’s creations, to name a few, have been commissioned for Philip Johnson’s Glass House, and Stone House Inn in Rhode Island, where she made fifteen custom-designed quilts and pillow shams to complement a modern renovation of the historic seaside resort.  Undeniably diverse, Denyse Schmidt’s quilts ingeniously bridge the gap between old and new, traditional and modern, dynamic and repose, craft and art.

Contacts:

http://www.dsquilts.com/

1  Kristin Link interview with Denyse Schmidt, April 2, 2012 at www.sewmamasew.com blog.

 

Fresh Interior of Trillium Soaps – Rockland, Maine

An intoxicating aroma of rosemary and lavender permeates the entire block in front of Trillium Soaps on 17 Pacific Street, across from the harbor in Rockland, Maine.   Aside from the herbal aromas having delightfully saturated the building materials, entering the store plays with my senses.  Time passes at an unhurried pace.  Sounds of footsteps on wood floor planks and the folding of butcher paper are hushed and honest.  I am sublimely transported to a bucolic paradise of a past era.

Trillium Soaps both makes and showcases their soaps and candles in the open plan store.  Functional production and sales areas are separated by a massive oak double countertop. Outside, passers by can silently watch the soap making process from the sidewalk through the large window.

Soaps and candles are attentively merchandised with thoughtfully selected antiques and accessories, which are also for sale.  Ample-sized baskets, milk-white ceramics, pastoral artwork and bundled rolls of linen fabric casually rest amidst the farm tables and product displays.  Ribbons and spools, old-fashioned marbles, painted wooden crates and a featured red wood poster bed with vintage grainsack bedding add to the homespun, freshly-scrubbed ambiance.

In business for 20 years, owners Peter and Nancy DiGirolamo moved Trillium Soaps to their current location in 2010. Their products are hand-made in small batches of organic olive, palm, and coconut oils, as well as rainwater and additional essential oils, flower petals, bergamot and French red clay, to name just a few.  Trillium Soaps’  simple and intimate interior appropriately conveys the wholesome essence of its product – it even makes my soul feel squeaky clean.  http://trilliumsoaps.com/

Destination Maine – Furniture and Accessories Integrating Maps of Maine

Detail of “Round Coffee Table” by Chart Table Company of Maine

The “Vacationland” slogan has proudly graced the Maine license plate since 1936, and for good reason.   Cool, pine-scented breezes, blue skies and lobster have lured vacationers to its shores for generations. Maine has certainly established itself as a favored destination.  If you can’t get enough of this beautiful state, you can bring it home with you!

“Occasional Table” by Chart Table Company of Maine

The Chart Table Company of Maine, based in Pownal, Maine, designs and fabricates elegant wood tables with inset nautical map table tops.  Expertly crafted, the table designs are simple and striking. Owner Ben MacDonald explains “the tables are very custom in nature in that the client not only selects the chart of map of their interest, they also can customize the area and points of interest on the chart/map that is most dear to their heart – from that customized information, I can crop the chart, design the table accordingly.” MacDonald works in collaboration with Galeyrie, a Falmouth, Maine company that specializes in vintage maps, among others. Tables are made from maple, cherry, mahogany, walnut or FSC lumber.  Finishes choices include lacquer, paint, Danish oil or wax.

“Vintage Maine Pillow 18×18” by salt-labs

“Vintage Portland Nautical Chart Pillow 18×18” by salt-labs

Robbi Lindeman of salt-labs, a small design studio based in Farmington Hills, Michigan, makes eye-catching digitally-printed textiles that are fabricated into pillow covers. Seductively colorful and intricately detailed, the designs are often sourced from collected vintage illustrations, maps and nautical charts and reinterpreted for the contemporary home. Salt-labs’ pillows are handmade using eco-friendly textiles and printing methods. The front panel is a 6.2 oz. linen/cotton blend while the reverse panel is 100% natural color linen.

“Mt. Desert Island” by Peter Fasano is a wonderful, quirky wallpaper that would offer humorous direction to a special space.  Boldly drawn like a sketch on a diner napkin, the “map” includes whimsical landmarks, figures and hand-written notes.  This wallpaper has an endearing, personal sketchbook quality to it.  Their website reveals “the inspiration comes from everywhere, but the product always reflects Peter’s own original twist”.  Available in three colorways, the Char/Antique is my favorite. All  Peter Fasano wall coverings are hand silk-screened using soluble, earth-based pigments.

 

 

 

Contacts:

www.charttablecompany.com / Ben MacDonald 207-318-9315

www.galeyrie.com

www.salt-labs.com

www.peterfasano.com