Great Minds Think Alike: Gaudi Still Inspires Designers

‘Visionary’, ‘eccentric’ and ‘surreal’ are words often used to describe the unique architecture of Antonio Gaudi.

Volumetric curves paired with unconventional embellishment designed by Gaudi turned the traditional order of architecture in the late 19th and early 20th century on its head. Gaudi’s buildings are a celebration in the Catalan city of Barcelona where seven works were declared UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 1984.

Gaudi is widely known for the imaginative use of colorful glazed tile mosaic as well as the simplistic repose of his signature parabolic arches. In mad scientist fashion, Gaudi designed every inch of space in his projects, inside and out – from light fixtures and switches to wrought iron hardware and furniture.

His designs, coined Catalonian Modernism (similar to Art Nouveau) referenced curvilinear shapes found in nature.  Bulging, twisting forms exude movement and seem to take on a life of their own, while other works connect to nature literally, such as applied decoration representing foliage or animals.

Although created more than a century ago, Gaudi’s vision still inspires contemporary designers. Today, architectural work and furniture designs pay homage to the great Catalan master, either directly or indirectly through technique and materials. When designing the Topit Chair shown below, designer Onur Cobanli was delighted when he realized that its form resembled that of an Antonio Gaudi chair. Cobanli admitted, “Great minds think alike!”

Check out some contemporary Gaudi-inspired designs:

Photo by Eric Roth

Broken Tile Kitchen Panel via Precedent Designworks

Photo by Anthony Lindsey Photography

Gaudi Submarine Bathroom, San Francisco. Photo by Anthony Lindsey Photography

Tile Garden Boobies via Darlene Graeser

Tile Garden Boobies via Darlene Graeser

Klimt Bubbles via Mercury Mosaics

Klimt Bubbles  in Minnesota Kitchen via Mercury Mosaics

Coyne House, Oklahoma via PBC Style

Coyne House, Oklahoma via PBC Style

Vennesla Library by Helen & Hard via arch20

Vennesla Library, Norway by Helen & Hard via arch20

Gaudi-inspired support by Whitman Architectural Design

Gaudi-inspired support in California Residence by Whitman Architectural Design

Custom patio railing & integral seating by Whitman Architectural Design

Custom patio railing & integral seating by Whitman Architectural Design

Pentagon Staircase by Siller Treppen

Pentagon Staircase by Siller Treppen

Bookshelf by dbd Studio

Bookshelf by dbd Studio via Contemporist

Gaulino Chair by Oscar Tusquets, 1987

Gaulino Chair by Oscar Tusquets via Barcelona Design

Topit Chair by Cobanli via MOOD

Topit Chair by Cobanli via MOOD

Gaudi inspired furniture, source unknown

Gaudi inspired furniture, source unknown

Cousin Chair by Meg Halloran

Cousin Chair by Meg O’Halloran Design

Related Links:

About Antonio Gaudi

Parc Guell

Casa Batllo

Precedent Designworks

Anthony Lindsey Photography

Darlene Graeser

Mercury Mosaics

PBC Style

Helen & Hard

Whitman Architectural Design

Siller Treppen

dbd Studio via Contemporist

Oscar Tusquets via Barcelona Design

Cobalni via MOOD

Meg O’Halloran Design

 

Comments

  1. You’ve done a wonderful job of compiling Gaudiesque projects!

  2. Hey, This is really cool! I’m an Interior Architect student, and I am actually researching Gaudi for my fourth year Research project! Love your examples of how Gaudi is still relevant! I have created a blog with videos every week to document the experience on Gaudi! It will include a visit to Barcelona where I hope to interview the public and this has inspired one of my questions, Maybe Do you think Gaudi’s Architecture is still relevant today? And does it inspire you? A great way to get public sentiment on Gaudi’s buildings and work! I’m going to link this site to my blog as its interesting and nice to see his style in contemporary form! Something different! 🙂 If you have time Check out the blog! 🙂

    • Karen Egly-Thompson says:

      Hi, Katy – thanks for the message and linking to my blog. I’ll check out your blog as well. I would love to hear the public’s response once you conduct your interviews in Barcelona. I’ve not been there myself, but would love to go someday too. Thanks again!

      • Sure, as soon as I have visited and done the interviews I will fill you in! It will also be a first time experience and it’s cool I’ll get to document it all! Will keep you updated! 🙂

  3. I have always been a fan of Gaudi and I love the way you encapsulate his style and influence with your words. Thank you for sharing.

Speak Your Mind

*